Don’t sell your product, sell the problem it solves.

     As soon as I saw this video on Sara Blakely’s Instagram stories I knew I had to share it and what it means to us as small business owners.

     Every product and service solves a problem, even if it’s a more frivolous one that may not seem important. I’ll use my two small businesses as examples. As a more “serious” example:

Clyde is a 17 year old dog who’s owners did not want to leave at a boarders over Thanksgiving so they called me.  

Clyde is a 17 year old dog who’s owners did not want to leave at a boarders over Thanksgiving so they called me.  

     Someone has a 15 year old dog—> they don’t want to board because he is old and will be stressed and anxious—>they look for alternatives and find me—> they hire me and their sweet dog gets to stay home in his own bed, with his own toys, stress free. Problem=solved.

 

     Knowing the problems people have that I could solve allows me to specifically sell my service to others like them.  I can now make targeted posts addressing these issues and align myself as a perfect choice for elderly pets or anxious pets who might not do so well at a boarding facility.

     Some products may not seem to have an obvious problem they solve, or even any at all. My other side work is selling hand embroidery on Etsy. No one NEEDS embroidery so it may seem frivolous and like there is no problem to be solved but here is just one example:

     Someone needs to buy a gift—> they want it to be handmade so they open Etsy—> they want it to reflect the recipient's taste so they search for their favorite movie/tv show/musician/book/color/whatever—> they come across a piece I made that fits their subject parameters—> like it and purchase—> give it as a gift. Problem=solved. It’s not curing world hunger but I have allowed my client to fix their problem with my product.

People order my embroidered children’s art pieces because they are looking for unique and meaningful gifts, often for grandparents of the little artists.  

People order my embroidered children’s art pieces because they are looking for unique and meaningful gifts, often for grandparents of the little artists.  

     Not every purchase solves a problem but every product can. I may stumble upon something I wasn’t looking for and buy it on a whim. I wasn’t looking to solve a problem, I just saw something I liked. However, that doesn’t change the fact that to someone else, that item does solve a problem.

     

     Figuring out what problems your product or service can solve will give you invaluable insight into who your target market is. Knowing who they are and marketing directly to them will improve your business. Target market is key in any business venture regardless if you are a small one person operation or a huge company.

      I hope this was able to help you even a little. If you are having trouble figuring out what problem you solve, feel free to ask me! I’d love to give an outsider's opinion or even help you get feedback from the DB&RB Facebook and Instagram communities!

 

Yours in business and motherhood,

Brittany